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Swofford: Testing is ‘critical,’ ACC moving forward with plan to play in fall

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ACC commissioner John Swofford admitted that there are no answers at this point but stated that coronavirus testing “is going to be critical for us to get back to play” in the fall.

He stated the ACC and the member schools are going into the fall sports season with the “anticipation of playing.” All member schools indicated they plan to be open in some fashion in the fall, he stated.

“Currently, there are more questions than answers,” Swofford said. “The collective we are trying to find the various paths forward that we might take. … Life is often about Plan B. So if plan A doesn’t work, you go to plan B. We are going to have to be ready for a plan C and a plan D. That’s a lot of the work that we’re doing at this point.”

There are four different scenarios financially for the ACC, possibly more, Swofford said. There is the prospect of playing football, playing an abbreviated season, not playing football but playing basketball and not playing any sports.

Swofford spoke with the media via video on Thursday afternoon after the conclusion of the league’s spring meetings, which were held virtually this week instead of at Amelia Island, Fla.

He stated that the “first and last focus” has to be to the health and welfare of players, coaches and support staff. The ACC has established a COVID-19 medical advisory group, which includes some doctors and medical personnel from the league’s schools.

Swofford commented that typically ACC administrators and school athletics administration know that after these meetings they can take a breather, enjoying the conclusion of spring sports and take time off during the summer. But he said this year is very different in that regard and that “time is our friend in a sense” as discussions take place in the coming months.

One question that remains difficult to answer is what if most ACC schools are able to play but one program or a small number aren’t able to take the field. Swofford indicated the schools that could play likely would move forward and compete.

When asked if he could see games take place without students being on campus he seemed to signal that would be left up to the institutions. But he said it “seems foreign to me” when contemplating that scenario. Most ACC schools have indicated that they plan to open this fall, with FSU stating that it will remain closed until Aug. 2.

The loss of revenue from the NCAA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments is significant – 66 percent in Swofford’s estimation – but he said the ACC will be distributing “about 98 percent of revenues” to schools. “Given the circumstances we feel pretty good about that,” Swofford said.

Discussions about name, image and likeness as well as the one-time transfer proposal were also prominent during the meetings, Swofford said.

Comments

  1. James Smalley Reply

    This is becoming all about the election. 69.7 % of the reported deaths are in 6 Northern Blue states ( and one purple) , Michigan. Medicare reimbursements to Hospitals on Coronovirus cases are significantly higher for Death certificates labeled Covid 19. If most of the country is reporting 4% death rates, and New Jersey is at 29%, who do you believe, Tony Soprano or the rest of America. Let’s play Football!

    • Jerry Kutz Reply

      The opinion expressed by my good friend Jim are not necessarily the opinion of the ownership of the Osceola… except for “Let’s play Football!”… I will add the caveat, if its safe.
      I agree with Swafford on this point, “Time is our friend in a sense.”
      As Florida and the other states open, the governors should get a real clear idea of the potential danger to players and fans over the coming 30 days. There’s no question the schools and the conferences want to, and need to, play football to salvage athletic budgets, so they want Plan A.
      Governor DeSantis has been aggressive about opening business and my hunch is he want’s to see Plan A too.
      As for me… I’m going to hope, pray and watch as my former colleagues in athletics and boosters grind away developing Plan B, C and D… just in case.
      I’m going to write a story about the plans the Miami Dolphins have developed for playing with 25 percent of their fans in the stadium. Its detailed.

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